Highland maya cargo system

Villages that were impoverished were able to get help easier because taxes were not charged, yet public work was given. Indigenous people filled these roles, which in theory gave them greater status within the community. The prevention of the accumulation of wealth by an individual member of the society, and the subsequent distribution of the wealth of the culture to all of its members, should create an egalitarian society, however, in the case of the Highland Maya Cargo System, this is not the case.

The village mayor or alcalde was charged with the responsibility of leading the villagers in a procession to Sunday Mass. The man would work in the household of his in-laws. Although the cargo system may have the initial intent to act as a leveling mechanism it does not seem to act as one in the case of the Highland Mayas.

Over time, these processions were conducted with greater ceremony, making use of trappings such as crosses, incense, and music. The colonial church did not insist on excessive Catholicization of existing indigenous practices, so long as there was no clear conflict between the two.

This term lasts one year. References Haviland, William A. The purpose of such a system is to act as a leveling mechanism. Office holders execute most of the tasks of local governments and churches. These roles, however, also placed economic obligations on their recipients and the clergy used them as a way to exercise control over the villagers.

These revolving offices, or cargos, become the unpaid responsibility of men who are active in civic life. This system is made up of a number of levels of prestige. Where it is practiced, there is generally some expectation of all local men to take part in this cargo system throughout their lives.

Cargo system

The cargo system was used and transformed by communities within the context of law to eliminate noble exemption privileges. Noble exemptions were opposed by the common people, who were worried that such exemptions would negatively impact the supply of labour to the point of constant service.

Furthermore, the legal enforcement of village obligations solidified communal social identity, rather than an identity dependent upon and linked to the national state.

Villagers were obligated to organize efforts to discharge debts related to cost of food, wafers and wine for the Mass and payment of the priests. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations.

Bevor Sie fortfahren...

The cargo system also affected marital life. It was a system in which involved faithful and long term community service. Therefore, in practice, the system was not as egalitarian as in the hypothetical sense, because while some men could move to greater positions and into seats of authority, others lacked the prestige to accomplish the same.

Searles and Lee,p. Women did not claim rights in relation to village government.

The Highland Maya : a case study in economic anthropology

Study Guide for the Telecourse Faces of Culture. Because the missionaries were small in number, they increasingly placed religious responsibilities in the hands of trusted members of the villages. This brought to an end many internal feuds over principales with regards to nobility.The Highland Maya have an economic system called a cargo-system that encourages the re-investment of wealth back into the community.

This system is made up of a number of levels of prestige. Each level has a prescrib %(1). [KOCE-TV (Television station: Huntington Beach, Calif.); Coast Community College District.; Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, inc.;] -- The complex interrelationship between economics and religion known as the "cargo" system, found among the Highland Maya of Mexico and Guatemala, is the subject of this program.

Feb 14,  · "The Highland Maya have an economic system called a cargo-system that encourages the re-investment of wealth back into the community. This system is made up of a number of levels of prestige.

The Highland Maya Cargo System

Each level has a prescribed set of responsibilities and prestige tied to killarney10mile.com: Resolved. "Highland Maya Cargo System" Essays and Research Papers Highland Maya Cargo System The Maya is a Mesoamerican civilization, noted for the only known fully developed written language of the pre-Columbian Americas, as well as for its art, architecture, and mathematical and astronomical systems.

The Highland Maya have an economic system called a cargo-system that encourages the re-investment of wealth back into the community. This system is made up of a number of levels of prestige.

Each level has a prescribed set of responsibilities and prestige tied to it. The cargo system (also known as the civil-religious hierarchy, fiesta or mayordomía system) is a collection of secular and religious positions held by men or households in rural indigenous communities throughout central and .

Download
Highland maya cargo system
Rated 0/5 based on 26 review